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Barton Peveril Receive Gift from Japanese Government

Barton Peveril Subject Leader for Japaneses, Asuko Sekine, and Principal, Jonathan Prest, with students studying Japanese.

Barton Peveril Sixth Form College has been gifted a cherry tree by the Japanese Government as part of the Sakura Cherry Tree Project.

The project aims to celebrate 150 years of friendship between the United Kingdom and Japan, with trees being planted in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Barton Peveril received the gift of friendship as a result of its Japanese courses, which give students an opportunity to learn a different language alongside their core programme of study. The College’s Subject Leader for Japanese, Asuko Sekine, headed the campaign to be recognised in the project.

“A real pleasure”

Speaking on the project, Asuko Sekine said:

“I am delighted that Barton Peveril has received the new cherry tree (sakura in Japanese) through the Sakura Cherry Tree Project.

“This is a gift from the Japanese people and one of over 6000 trees planted throughout the UK to celebrate a new era in UK – Japan friendship.  

“It is a comforting thought that it will grow and blossom year after year at Barton Peveril even after staff and students leave. I hope we, especially our students of Japanese, enjoy its flowering every spring!  We might be able to do a ‘Hana-mi (Cherry blossom viewing)’ next spring.”

Barton Peveril Principal, Jonathan Prest, also commented on the project:

“It is a real pleasure to plant a flowering cherry tree, so generously given by the people of Japan. For many years the College has taught students Japanese, thanks to our outstanding Subject Leader Asuko Sekine, who has also organised regular trips to Japan.

“The tree sits in pride of place in the Science Centre gardens and joins several other specimens with dedications, amongst them the “Tree of Hope”, an oak tree planted on Holocaust Memorial Day. The gardens in the College are an important place for students to socialise, find some tranquillity, or in which to be thoughtful. It is great that we can reflect upon the close friendship between two countries with such different cultures. It is also a lasting symbol of the importance of peace, friendship and positive values.”

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